Your Kids Are Tougher Than You Think

The year is 1925, my grandfather is only 15. He has two younger brothers, aged 10 and 3. He is living in a mining camp in Idaho with his mother, who is a school teacher, and his father, a veteran of the Spanish-American war of 1898, a miner and alcoholic. That year, his mother contracts tuberculosis and dies. Within a month, his depressed father drinks himself to death, leaving the three boys on their own. My grandfather, now head of the household, drops out of high school and goes to work hand loading boxcars at a railroad yard to support and raise his brothers. By 1930, he marries my grandmother and they start a life of farming (still taking care of his brothers) in which they become successful, running over 2000 acres, despite being in the middle of the Great Depression.

The reason I tell this story is to contrast this with the typical teenager today. Hooked on video games and porn, no work ethic, no real responsibilities. I do not know of any kid that would take on that sort of responsibility today. Continue reading “Your Kids Are Tougher Than You Think”

Raising Daughters

“…I’ve made it my business to observe fathers and daughters. And I’ve seen some incredible, beautiful things. Like the little girl who’s not very cute – her teeth are funny, and her hair doesn’t grow right, and she’s got on thick glasses – but her father holds her hand and walks with her like she’s a tiny angel that no one can touch. He gives her the best gift a woman can get in this world: protection. And the little girl learns to trust the man in her life. And all the things that the world expects from women – to be beautiful, to soothe the troubled spirit, heal the sick, care for the dying, send the greeting card, bake the cake – all of those things become the way we pay the father back for protecting us…”
― Adriana Trigiani, Big Stone Gap

Continue reading “Raising Daughters”